Eden Succulents
Are you looking for a houseplant that will brighten your home, but you're not very confident that you have a green thumb? Are you one of those forgetful gardeners? Then the perfect plant for you to grow is flowering succulents.
7 Charming Flowering Succulents to Grow in Your Home
Are you looking for a houseplant that will brighten your home, but you're not very confident that you have a green thumb? Are you one of those forgetful gardeners? Then the perfect plant for you to grow is flowering succulents.

1. Echeveria

These popular succulents are regarded by many as the most beautiful genus of their kind for their stunning rose-shaped leaves. They are native to the semi-desert regions of Central America and Mexico. Echeveria comes in a variety of charming pastel color palette.

The short stalks of Echeveria give birth to stunning flowers that are bell-shaped. They usually bloom in summer or early fall. The beauty of Echeveria is like a work of art, so it was named after Atanasio Echeverria y Godoy, a famous Mexican botanical artist in the 19th century.

2. Aeoniums

Aeoniums, also known as the Tree Houseleeks, are odd-looking succulents that originated from the Canary Islands. Aeoniums thrive in the Mediterranean climate – not too cold nor too hot. The name Aeonium comes from the Greek word aionos, which means “ageless.”

It can have long, arching or short, stubby stems. The leaves are rosette-shaped and somewhat rounded. The small and star-like flowers of Aeonium grow from the center of the rosettes, and they grow in clusters. Most Aeoniums produce flowers in late winter or spring.

3. Schlumbergera

Schlumbergera originates from the coastal mountains of southeastern Brazil. In Brazil, they are called “May flower” because that's when they bloom in that region. In the U.S, they are commonly known as the “Christmas cactus” from the season when they usually bloom. The bell-shaped flowers of Schlumbergera can come in white, yellow, red, orange, pink, or purple. Schlumbergera often grows in the trees or rocks in the wild, but they can also be grown in pots as indoor plants.

4. Rhipsalidopsis

Popularly known as Easter Cactus or Spring Cactus, Rhipsalidopsis usually blooms from March to May. The flowers of Rhipsalidopsis are star-shaped and comes in varying cheery colors like red, orange, peach, pink, and lavender. The flowers, which typically lasts for several weeks, open with the rising of the sun and close at sunset. Rhipsalidopsis are native to the South American countries, specifically the rainforests of Brazil.

Rhipsalidopsis

5. Senecio radicans

The species of Senecio radicans originated from South Africa, where they grow on the ground. These trailing succulents are more commonly known as String of Bananas or String of Fishhooks because of their greenish-blue banana-shaped or fishhook-shaped leaves. The flowers of Senecio radicans typically blooms in the late winter or early spring. The tiny flowers are cinnamon-scented and come in white or off-white. They emerge in clusters and look like paintbrush heads.

6. Sedum morganianum

Most growers know Sedum morganianum as Donkey Tail or Burro' s-tail. It's a trailing succulent that you can hang on baskets. It has fleshy, teardrop-shaped greenish-blue leaves. This species is native to Southern Mexico and Honduras. Sedum morganianum flowers emerge in summer. They are star-shaped and come in shades of deep pink or red.

7. Euphorbia Milli

Euphorbia Milli is a succulent that grows into a sprawling shrub with grayish-brown thorny stems. It's commonly known as the Crown of Thorns because it resembles the crown of thorns placed on Jesus before he was crucified.

Euphorbia Milli has bright green leaves and produces flowers almost all year round, but are most abundant in summer and spring. The flowers, which are actually bracts, are available in yellow, white, pink, or red, last for several weeks. The Euphorbia Milli is a species native to Madagascar.

If you want to learn more information about succulents and everything to do with them, feel free to take a look through our catalog of content and see if we have a topic that you may be interested in. If you have something to say, contribute to the discussion and leave a comment!